IndiaThe 5 key issues facing women working in the G20

Key Findings

Stated work-home life balance was the key issue for women
Would report harassment
Said they have the same access to business networks as men

Country Summary

Work-life balance topped the list of the most important challenges Indian women face in the workplace, with 57 percent saying it was their biggest concern, while the second biggest worry was flexible working, flagged by 42 percent of women. Contrary to data showing the pay gay in India was one of the largest in the G20, over six in 10 Indian women, or 61 percent, said they were confident they were earning the same as men doing the same job.  Women in the world's second most populous country were also upbeat about having the same access to business networks as men with 53 percent agreeing they had.
       
But the most surprising finding in India was related to harassment. Over a quarter of Indian women, or 27 percent, said that they had been harassed at work and Indian women were more likely than any other women in the G20 to speak out. Of those harassed, 53 percent, said they would always or most of the time report this. The high number comes after a blitz in media coverage over the poor treatment of women that hit the headlines following the fatal gang-rape of a student on bus in Delhi in December 2012.

Polling Results

How india scored from 1 to 19 for each question. (1 is the most positive).

  • 15

    Men have better access to jobs than me?

    (40%)
  • 03

    I have access to the same types of business networks as men?

    (53%)
  • 13

    Men have better access to professional development and career growth opportunities than me?

    (45%)
  • 07

    It’s as easy for me to start a business as it is for a man?

    (45%)
  • 01

    I am confident that I earn at least the same salary as a man doing the same?

    (61%)
  • 05

    I can have a family without it damaging my career?

    (61%)

Findings by Country

Click a country on the map below to explore a summary of the key findings and see the polling results.

Questions We Asked

Click a question below to explore a summary of the key findings and see the polling results.

Men have better access to jobs than me?

Almost half of the women questioned, or 48 percent, said men had better access to jobs than they did while only 21 percent did not think this was the case. The poll found that women in Saudi Arabia in particular were concerned about equal access to jobs with 61 percent agreeing or strongly agreeing that men had an advantage.

I have access to the same types of business networks as men?

The poll found that 39 percent of women overall thought they had access to the same types of business networks as men while 24 percent disagreed. Women in Indonesia, Mexico and India were most confident of having the same access to business networks as men while the least confident women were in Japan, South Korea and Italy.

Men have better access to professional development and career growth opportunities than me?

Almost half of the women questioned, or 47 percent, said men did fare better when it came to professional development and career opportunities while 22 percent disagreed. Women in Italy, France and Indonesia were particularly concerned about the lack of level playing field when it came to career opportunities.

It’s as easy for me to start a business as it is for a man?

Over a third of women, or 38 percent, agreed or strongly agreed that it was as easy for them to set up a business as it was for a man while 26 percent did not think this was the case. Women in Mexico , Indonesia, Russia and Turkey were the most confident on this question with more than half of the women polled in those countries agreeing that they had the same opportunities to set up a business as a man.

I am confident that I earn at least the same salary as a man doing the same?

Only four in every 10 women polled, 40 percent, were confident that they were earning the same salary as a man doing the same job. Women in Japan, Germany and France were the least confident that they were paid equally to men. Women in India and Saudi Arabia were most confident about earning the same as their male peers even though World Economic Forum data showed these 2 countries came last in the G20 on a female to male ratio on earned income.

I can have a family without it damaging my career?

Nearly half of the women polled, or 47 percent, said they could have children without damaging their career while 23 percent disagreed. The women most confident about having a family alongside a career were in Brazil, Indonesia and South Africa while those who were least confident were in Japan, Germany and Britain.

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